• Recent Posts

  • Martindale Hubbell AV Rating

    The Greater Williamsburg area is an exciting place to live and work, especially because of the large number of entrepreneurs who have built businesses from the ground up. These entrepreneurs have taken their passion and made it their profession. Many of us want to take that step. Before you begin, you need to think of the type of business entity you want to form. Our attorneys have extensive business experience, from small one-person companies to publicly traded major corporations. Our attorneys are among the leaders in Virginia in the representation of Common Interest Communities. These communities are generally referred to as "homeowners associations," or "HOAs," and "condominium associations." In the greater Williamsburg area alone, we provide legal assistance to nearly 100 associations. Our attorneys have successfully prosecuted and defended a wide array of civil disputes involving community association covenant enforcement, commercial transactions, construction disputes, contracts, real estate matters, boundary line and easement disputes, employment matters, antitrust litigation, copyright violations, administrative proceedings, and estate issues. Real Estate law encompasses a wide variety of matters, and our attorneys have vast experience to assist you. Whether you need assistance with a commercial or residential closing, or you have questions relating to residential or commercial leasing, we provide experienced advice and counsel to our clients. Zoning law can be a complicated maze of statutes and ordinances. We have ample experience in successful applications for rezoning, variance, and special use permit requests. Finally, commercial and residential construction provide special challenges with respect to financing issues and the construction process. We serve as counsel to various financial institutions.

When is it unlawful for a business to terminate an employee?

April 23, 2020 on 2:10 pm | In Business Planning, Jason Howell, Merger & Acquisition, Neal J. Robinson, State & Federal Litigation | No Comments

The short answer is, rarely. Virginia is an at-will employment state. This means that an employer can discharge an employee for any reason or for no reason at all, just not for an unlawful reason. An employer who terminates an employee for an unlawful reason may be liable to the employee. The question answer in this blog post is: when is a reason unlawful?

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

No Comments »

My Commercial Tenant is gone . . . should I re-enter the Property?

April 23, 2020 on 2:10 pm | In Business Law, Business Planning, John Tarley, Land Use Planning, Real Estate Litigation, Real Estate Strategies, State & Federal Litigation | No Comments

Sometimes commercial tenants, unable to stay current with their lease obligations, decide to close up shop and abandon their leased premises. In those circumstances, commercial landlords need to know their options. This blog post discusses a commercial landlord’s options when a commercial tenant abandons its lease.

MC900185910

Continue reading “My Commercial Tenant is gone . . . should I re-enter the Property?”

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

No Comments »

Can an advisor be held liable for the false statements in a prospectus made by another?

April 23, 2020 on 2:10 pm | In Business Planning, Contributors, General Interest, Merger & Acquisition, Neal J. Robinson, State & Federal Litigation | No Comments
Williamsburg Virginia Business Lawyers

United States Supreme Court

Previously we blogged about a pending case before the Supreme Court that had the possibility to significantly increase the liability of persons for assisting in the preparation of a “prospectus.” As of June 13, 2011, the Supreme Court handed down an opinion in that case, styled as Janus Capital Group, Inc. v. First Derivative Traders, No. 09-525 (S. Ct.).

The determination of this case is relevant to accountants and business lawyers who assist in the preparation of documents for the purpose of raising money for investment. The Janus Capital Group, Inc. case presented the question of who may be deemed to have “made” an untrue statement for the purposes of Rule 10b-5, and specifically whether someone who assisted in the preparation of a prospectus could “make” a statement through such assistance. As the result of a 5-4 decision, accountants and business attorneys may breathe a little easier. Continue reading “Can an advisor be held liable for the false statements in a prospectus made by another?”

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

No Comments »

Update for Limited Liability Companies: What happens to Membership Interest when a Member Dies?

April 23, 2020 on 2:09 pm | In Business Law, Business Planning, John Tarley | No Comments

We blogged about the Virginia Supreme Court case of Ott v. Monroe. In that case, the Court ruled that when a father, in his will, assigned his majority interest in a limited liability company to his daughter, he only assigned a profit interest, not a control interest. Consequently, his daughter did not have the authority to “run” the company, absent the consent of the remaining LLC members.

In its 2013 session, the General Assembly modified the relevant LLC statutes in an attempt to overturn the Virginia Supreme Court’s decision. This blog post examines the new statute, and how it may impact your limited liability company.

Business Deal
Continue reading “Update for Limited Liability Companies: What happens to Membership Interest when a Member Dies?”

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

No Comments »

Do you need an attorney to negotiate on your behalf?

March 31, 2014 on 10:31 am | In Business Planning, General Interest, Merger & Acquisition, Real Estate Litigation, Real Estate Strategies, State & Federal Litigation, Weekly Tweets | No Comments

This blog post comes from Jason Howell, our 2011 Summer Associate when he was a rising third-year law student at the William & Mary Law School. Jason is working with us this summer and debuts his first blog post.

Negotiation can be challenging. Whether you are negotiating the terms of a business agreement, trying to buy or sell property, or settling a dispute, getting to an agreement can be difficult. Even if you are successful in getting the other side to negotiate with you, you may feel at a disadvantage or worry that there is something in the final negotiated agreement you are missing.

Hiring an experienced attorney to represent you can give you advantages that can help you get to an acceptable agreement. By using an attorney in your negotiation, you can benefit from the attorney’s knowledge and skill, which can help you to reach your negotiation goals.

Continue reading “Do you need an attorney to negotiate on your behalf?”

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

No Comments »

Limited Liability Companies: What happens to an LLC when a Member dies?

September 3, 2013 on 9:26 am | In Business Planning, John Tarley, Merger & Acquisition, Weekly Tweets | No Comments

This case has been overturned by statute. Check out this blog post for the details.

We have written about the importance of operating agreements to help succession planning for your limited liability company (“LLC”). Operating agreements can help the company with procedures to remove a member, or with procedures to permit a member to leave the LLC on his own accord. This blog post reviews a recent Virginia Supreme Court case that shows the importance, and limitations of your LLC operating agreement to set forth succession planning of a member’s interest when that member dies.

Williamsburg Virginia Business Lawyers

LLC Agreements

Continue reading “Limited Liability Companies: What happens to an LLC when a Member dies?”

Republished by Blog Post Promoter

No Comments »

The Proposed Tax Legislation and You

December 12, 2010 on 3:17 pm | In Business Planning, Neal J. Robinson, Real Estate Strategies, Weekly Tweets | No Comments

In S8721, S. Amend.4753 amending H.R.4853, there is some good news with respect to the long in limbo future of federal estate and gift tax legislation for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2010.   Further, it appears that the estate and gift tax amendments are likely to pass both houses of Congress this year, though nothing is certain in the current legislative environment.

Under the proposed legislation, the amount of a decedent’s taxable estate excludable from estate tax would be $5 million.  For years beginning in 2012, the exclusion amount would be indexed for inflation.  While the provisions of the proposed legislation will sunset with the entirety of the proposed tax package, this time as of December 31, 2012, the inflation index provisions as to these provisions may be an indication that there exists some consensus that the estate and gift tax components of the current tax bill may represent appropriate long-term policy.

Continue reading “The Proposed Tax Legislation and You”

No Comments »
Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next
« Previous Page
Web Development by OneWaveMedia.Com